Do bacteria and germs lurk in your carpet? Rexburg, ID

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Do bacteria and other dangers lurk in your carpets?

Most of us vacuum our carpets to clean up a mess or freshen their look.  But carpets can actually collect mold spores and allergens, and in some cases can be reservoirs of bacteria or viruses – so cleaning them serves an important health function.  You’d be surprised at what might be lurking between carpet fibers, especially if you don’t vacuum often or schedule regular professional carpet cleanings.

 

According to eHow.comNorovirus, Salmonella, and Campylobacte can all collect in your carpets.  Norovirus, also known as the Norwalk Virus, can cause the stomach flu and other digestive problems.  It is able to survive on carpet fibers for four to six weeks, and can become airborne each time someone walks on the carpet. Most of us have heard of Salmonella, and think of it as a food-borne illness.  Salmonella is a pathogen that can cause diarrhea, fever and abdominal cramps, and is especially dangerous to young children and elderly adults. Although we associate it most often with contaminated food, Salmonella can be tracked into your home – and carpets – on the bottom of shoes.  One study showed that 15 of 55 (27.2%) of vacuum cleaner bags from households with occupational exposure to Salmonella enterica were positive for the virus, as were 1 of 24 (4.2%) in households without known exposure.  Occupational exposure includes carpeting in such places as cattle farms with known salmonellosis in cattle, a salmonella research laboratory, or a veterinary clinic seeing an outbreak of salmonellosis.  This is one good reason you should never eat food that falls on the floor, in your home or at any other location. The bacteria Campylobacter is found most often in winter, and can show up especially in damp carpets.  It can cause an illness called campylobacteriosis, which is especially dangerous to people with compromised immune systems. Bacteria, like mold, thrives in moist environments, which means that floors and carpets that have experienced flood damage are especially at risk for exposure.  According to a recent article, river water, in the case of flooding, is comparable to bacteria-laden sewage water – so any porous floor covering touched by river water should be replaced.  Floor coverings affected by groundwater seepage might be salvageable – carpets affected by groundwater can be dried and cleaned, although wet padding should be replaced

 

Pristine Carpet Cleaning-Rexburg, ID 83440